Put your best foot forward with a great business card

As a new small business owner or a solopreneur, one of your first – and most important business expenses – will be business cards. These small pieces of paper are one of the most important marketing tools you’ll ever have. You want to make sure they’re getting the marketing job done.

The business cards I hate most are ones that require me to get out my magnifying glass to read the phone number. I realize I have poor eyesight, but I’ve received business cards that even my housemate, who has 20/20 vision, has had a hard time reading.

Try to make your business card a conversation starter if possible. My first business card for my own business back in 1989 got attention because it was a fold-over that had the company name on the front and then all the pertinent contact info once people opened it up. Yes, it was definitely expensive because it required two-sided printing, but people always commented positively on it when I handed it to them.

My current business card also attracts attention because of its small size. Its depth is about half that of a regular sized business card; again, people always comment on it and it’s much easier to stuff in a wallet. I think it’s good to switch up your business card every couple years so don’t order a boatload just because you’re going to save bucks by printing in bulk. Life does intervene; you may move before you use up those five boxes of cards you’ve ordered. I don’t know about you, but I’ve never come up with a good use for outdated business cards.

And speaking of costs, don’t ever cheap out on the paper stock you select for your business card. You’re not aiming to build a flimsy business, so why hand out a flimsy business card? Everything about your business card should speak quality.

Below is a helpful infographic that was kindly provided by Barry Robinson, owner of X Print, gives you lots of food for thought when designing your business card. I found the information on business card trends to be particularly interesting, along with the very safe advice to only include vital contact information. I’ve been given business cards that are so crammed with information that it’s difficult to figure out which phone number to call.

 

 

 

 

XPrint Business Cards Infographic

1 comment

  1. Great insight on how to bring someones business cards to the next level!

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